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Vinyl Record Album LP Pressing by
Donald Byrd and Gigi Gryce "Jazz Lab" on Columbia Records CL 998
Price: $95.00
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Original 1957 Donald Byrd and Gigi Gryce "Jazz Lab" on Columbia Records (CL 998).

GRADES*
VINYL NM - high gloss - very nice - few minor sleeve scuffs

LABEL NM- columbia six eye - shows use, a few very minor spindle marks

COVER VG this cover is very very nice although it has been down graded as the back cover upper left has several dates possible the date the record was played or taped?? otherwise this cover would be (NM-) - very very minor ring wear - and the slightest of rounding at the corners - please see image

SIDE A. - track list:
1. Speculation 2. Over the rainbow 3. Nica's tempo 4. Blue Concept

SIDE B. - track list:
1. Little niles 2. Sans souci 3. I remember Clifford

The nucleus of the Jazz Lab Quintet - Gigi Gryce - alto sax, Donald Byrd - trumpet, Tommy Flanagan - piano, Wendell Marshall - bass, Art Taylor - drums.
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Don Byrd Gigi Gryce Jazz Lab Columbia Records CL 998 Jazz Vinyl Record Hard Bop lp
Don Byrd Gigi Gryce Jazz Lab 1957 Columbia Records CL 998
Alto saxophonist arranger Gigi Gryce and trumpeter Donald Byrd's innovative, but unfortunately short lived Jazz Lab Quintet recorded several sides during 1957, seven of which were released on this excellent Columbia album a handful of other titles were collectively made for Riverside, Verve, and RCA. The nucleus band of Gryce, Byrd, pianist Tommy Flanagan a spot also filled by Wade Legge and Hank Jones, bassis and drummer Art Taylor are augmented on four cuts here by trombonists Benny Powell and Jimmy Cleveland, French horn player Julius Watkins, baritone saxophonist Sahib Shihab, and tuba player Don Butterfield. The expanded ensemble turn in fleetly swinging renditions of Horace Silver's "Speculation" and Gryce's "Nica's Tempo" while varying the mood a bit with a ballad reading of Benny Golson's "I Remember Clifford" and a Far East-tinged waltz take on Randy Weston's "Little Niles" shades of Miles Davis' Birth of the Cool group are heard in the complex, yet featherweight arrangements by Gryce. The quintet tracks include Gryce's "Sans Souci" and a provocative version of "Over the Rainbow." With some of the best arrangements heard in jazz and excellent solos by Gryce, Byrd, and Flanagan, Jazz Lab makes for an excellent introduction to the hard bop catalog.

SIDE A. - track list:
1. Speculation 2. Over the rainbow 3. Nica's tempo 4. Blue Concept

SIDE B. - track list:
1. Little niles 2. Sans souci 3. I remember Clifford

The nucleus of the Jazz Lab Quintet - Gigi Gryce - alto sax, Donald Byrd - trumpet, Tommy Flanagan - piano, Wendell Marshall - bass, Art Taylor - drums.

Jazz has been called America's classical music, and for good reason. Along with the blues, its forefather, it is one of the first truly indigenous musics to develop in America, yet its unpredictable, risky ventures into improvisation gave it critical cache with scholars that the blues lacked. At the outset, jazz was dance music, performed by swinging big bands. Soon, the dance elements faded into the background and improvisation became the key element of the music. As the genre evolved, the music split into a number of different styles, from the speedy, hard-hitting rhythms of be-bop and the laid-back, mellow harmonies of cool jazz to the jittery, atonal forays of free jazz and the earthy grooves of soul jazz. What tied it all together was a foundation in the blues, a reliance on group interplay and unpredictable improvisation. Throughout the years, and in all the different styles, those are the qualities that defined jazz.

Although some claim that Hard Bop arose as a reaction to the softer sounds featured in cool jazz, it was actually an extension of bop that largely ignored West Coast jazz. The main differences between hard bop and bop are that the melodies tend to be simpler and often more "soulful"; the rhythm section is usually looser, with the bassist not as tightly confined to playing four-beats-to-the-bar as in bop; a gospel influence is felt in some of the music; and quite often, the saxophonists and pianists sound as if they were quite familiar with early rhythm & blues. Since the prime time period of hard bop (1955-70) was a decade later than bop, these differences were a logical evolution and one can think of hard bop as bop of the '50s and '60s. By the second half of the 1960s, the influence of the avant garde was being felt and some of the more adventurous performances of the hard bop stylists (such as Jackie McLean and Lee Morgan) fell somewhere between the two styles. With the rise of fusion and the sale of Blue Note (hard bop's top label) in the late '60s, the style fell on hard times although it was revived to a certain extent in the 1980s. Much of the music performed by the so-called Young Lions during the latter decade (due to other influences altering their style) was considered modern mainstream, although some groups (such as the Harper Brothers and T.S. Monk's sextet) have kept the 1960s' idiom alive
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